Copyright

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Ending World War Copyright

    Beyond the Book
    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    The creative industries – and the technology companies that carry their content – may share a common customer, but little else. Where it comes to copyright law, their differences have often flared into open war. Technology companies dream of rewriting copyright law to free up content; and content creators search for ways to employ technology in their own favor to prevent piracy. As Non-Executive Chairman of The Copyright Hub Ltd., Richard Hooper is calling for a truce in the copyright wars and has suggestions for forging a lasting peace. At CCC’s US headquarters in Danvers,…
  • Judiciary Committee Hearing on Moral Rights, Termination Rights, Resale Royalty, and Copyright Term

    DigitalKoans
    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:32 am
    The U.S. House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on moral rights, termination rights, resale royalty, and copyright term. Here's an excerpt from "Congress Takes On Copyright Term, Moral Rights, and More": How is this going to work? It's hard to say. Probably not very well. The hearing structure allows a handful of witnesses to […]
  • Michael Carroll to Congress: “Copyrights have to expire.”

    Creative Commons » Commons News
    Elliot Harmon
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am
    Eager Street / Seth Sawyers / CC BY This week, Creative Commons US lead and CC board member Michael Carroll addressed the US House of Representatives Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet. In his address, he emphasized that the success of Creative Commons tools doesn’t eliminate the need for copyright reform; it underscores it. He also laid out the case for why Congress should not extend copyright terms again. Congress, copyrights have to expire. The constitution says so. Congress’ power to grant the exclusive right to authors in their writings is for a…
  • Subscription Services for Books

    Copyfight
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:51 am
    In today's "Whatever" blog entry, John Scalzi talks about his books and various subscription services. The short form is that he would want to see the money, first. Since his novels are controlled by a big-name publisher there would also need to be some money flowing to that publisher. The way the economics of these things work, it's probably a good deal for many self-published authors who are struggling to get noticed, but probably not a good deal for big names who already have a big house backing them. Streaming services for music, and the controversies around them, provide a cautionary…
  • “Why Open?” course now open for sign-up

    Creative Commons » Commons News
    Jane Park
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Project 365 #303: 301009 Blink And You’ll Miss It! / Pete / CC BY Another run of School of Open courses is starting up in August, September and October! The first course to kick things off is a second iteration of “Why Open?” “Why Open?” was collaboratively developed and facilitated one year ago in August 2013; now the facilitators are back to run it a second time from 10 August to 5 September 2014. What is “Why Open?” From its About page, Why Open? What does open mean? Does it mean free? Does it mean without restriction? What is the role of the…
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    Copyfight

  • Subscription Services for Books

    22 Jul 2014 | 10:51 am
    In today's "Whatever" blog entry, John Scalzi talks about his books and various subscription services. The short form is that he would want to see the money, first. Since his novels are controlled by a big-name publisher there would also need to be some money flowing to that publisher. The way the economics of these things work, it's probably a good deal for many self-published authors who are struggling to get noticed, but probably not a good deal for big names who already have a big house backing them. Streaming services for music, and the controversies around them, provide a cautionary…
  • Lest You Had Any Doubts, the ALA is on the Right Side Again

    21 Jul 2014 | 10:50 am
    I got an update from American Library Association (ALA) letting me know that they had joined with other higher education and library organization to file a joint comment to the FCC in support of net neutrality. This should serve to remind everyone that while the Internet is perhaps the most amazing commercial platform yet invented, it's also an information access mechanism for schools, for libraries, for communities, and for the public. As such it needs not to have "paid prioritization" and it needs rules that allow us to choose what we get, not the cable companies. The Internet has a public,…
  • Deadly Effects of Unaffordable Medicines (TPP)

    18 Jul 2014 | 10:46 am
    On the eve of the next round of secret talks on the festering pushole that is the TPP - the trade treaty so secret it can only be seen the by the multinational corporations that are writing it - MSF is once again attempting to encourage some variant of sanity. As I've written before, MSF/Doctors Without Borders is opposed to the TPP provisions that promote patent protection over human protection. In their latest missive (linked above) the organization points out that "harmful new rules" in TPP will push prices higher for life-saving medicines, and of course this will hit the poorest countries…
  • Planet Money on the Case Against Patents

    15 Jul 2014 | 1:23 pm
    NPR's Planet Money podcast did a segment on the case against patents. It's mostly an exploration of how one would cope economically in a world without protection for certain kinds of IP. Sadly, they continue the mini-fiction that Tesla is "giving away" its patents. The show is largely based on a paper published by two economists, Michele Boldrin and David Levine in which they argue against patents from an economists perspective. The very first sentence of the paper states baldly that "there is no empirical evidence that patents serve to increase innovation and productivity." In fact, they…
  • FMC + Musicians vs FCC on Net Neutrality

    15 Jul 2014 | 7:13 am
    Our friends at the Future of Music Coalition rounded up a star list of songwriters, performers, and independent artists try and get the FCC to back off its plans to wreck net neutrality. Kevin Erickson was kind enough to send me a link to the collected artists' comments, which you can read online at the FMC site. My favorite pull quote from the comment filing:We music people know payola when we see it. And what we see in Chairman Wheeler’s proposal doesn't give us any confidence that we won’t end up with an Internet where pay-by-play rules the day. We've heard this song before, and…
 
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    Creative Commons » Commons News

  • “Why Open?” course now open for sign-up

    Jane Park
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Project 365 #303: 301009 Blink And You’ll Miss It! / Pete / CC BY Another run of School of Open courses is starting up in August, September and October! The first course to kick things off is a second iteration of “Why Open?” “Why Open?” was collaboratively developed and facilitated one year ago in August 2013; now the facilitators are back to run it a second time from 10 August to 5 September 2014. What is “Why Open?” From its About page, Why Open? What does open mean? Does it mean free? Does it mean without restriction? What is the role of the…
  • Wattpad upgrades to Version 4.0 of CC licenses

    Elliot Harmon
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:23 am
    Fiction-writing community Wattpad has upgraded to the Creative Commons Version 4.0 licenses and unveiled several improvements to its CC implementation. As of today, there are 300,000 CC-licensed stories on Wattpad, making this one of the largest adoptions of Version 4.0 to date. From the press release: (72 KB PDF) “The biggest question facing new writers today isn’t how to protect their work; it’s how to find a readership for it, said Cory Doctorow, science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger. “It makes complete sense that so many Wattpad writers are…
  • School of Open’s CC4Kids at the Code4CT Maker Party

    Kelsey Wiens
    18 Jul 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Code4CT girls with cc4kids certificates / Kelsey Wiens / CC BY #Code4CT is a three-week training program from Innovate South Africa with twenty-four grade 10 and 11 girls from Centre for Science and Technology (COSAT) in Khayelitsha (Cape Town, South Africa). The three-week course consists of sessions on how the web works and actively participating in building web content. Running over the girls winter school break, they learn about the design process, HTML and CSS programming languages – skills they use to build WordPress sites for their clients. The girls then take their new skills…
  • European Commission endorses CC licenses as best practice for public sector content and data

    Timothy Vollmer
    17 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    Today the European Commission released licensing recommendations to support the reuse of public sector information in Europe. In addition to providing guidance on baseline license principles for public sector content and data, the guidelines suggest that Member States should adopt standardized open licenses – such as Creative Commons licenses: Several licences that comply with the principles of ‘openness’ described by the Open Knowledge Foundation to promote unrestricted re-use of online content, are available on the web. They have been translated into many languages, centrally…
  • Michael Carroll to Congress: “Copyrights have to expire.”

    Elliot Harmon
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am
    Eager Street / Seth Sawyers / CC BY This week, Creative Commons US lead and CC board member Michael Carroll addressed the US House of Representatives Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet. In his address, he emphasized that the success of Creative Commons tools doesn’t eliminate the need for copyright reform; it underscores it. He also laid out the case for why Congress should not extend copyright terms again. Congress, copyrights have to expire. The constitution says so. Congress’ power to grant the exclusive right to authors in their writings is for a…
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    Copyright Litigation Blog

  • May Germany Launder Nazi Looted Art In New York? Federal Judge Concludes "Yes"

    7 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Pablo Picasso's Madame Soler 1905 - Stolen From Paul Bartholdy-MendelssohnIn Schoeps v. Free State of Bavaria, 13 Civ. 2048 (SDNY June 27, 2014)http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/new-york/nysdce/1:2013cv02048/409721/54  the Hon. Jed S. Rakoff dismissed a case by Jewish heirs seeking to recover Nazi looted art that had been spirited to New York, and then repurchased by Bavaria, where the stolen artwork now proudly hangs in a Munich museum.   The SDNY threw the case out pursuant to a motion to dismiss, which means that the plaintiff was deprived of…
  • Copyright Law – Ninth Circuit – Is There A DMCA Safe Harbor For Video Sharing Services?

    2 Jul 2014 | 10:13 am
      UMG Recordings, Inc. v. Shelter Capital Partners LLC, 2013 WL 1092793 (9thCir. 2013). UMG sued Veoh, a video sharing service that provides both user-generated content and licensed content, for copyright infringement.  Veoh asserted an affirmative defense under the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. § 512(c) (the “DMCA”) which provides a “safe harbor” against liability for copyright infringement for internet service providers who qualify for and follow the statutory scheme which include implementing a notice and takedown system.  Veoh permits subscribers to…
  • Federal Civil Practice CLE Program @ SDNY - May 5

    30 Apr 2014 | 8:23 am
    Federal Civil Practice CLE Program SDNY - May 5 www.dunnington.com Copyright law, fine art and navigating the courts. All practice, no theory.Copyright Litigation Handbook (Thomson Reuters Westlaw 2012-2013) by Raymond J. Dowd Find Ray Dowd at Dunnington Bartholow & Miller LLP Copyright Litigation Handbook (West 6th Ed. 2012) by Raymond J. Dowd Purchase on Amazon.com and Westlaw (Directory: COPYLITIG)
  • George Grosz: Cultural Enemy Number One of Hitler and the MoMA - Tomorrow Night National Arts Club!

    29 Apr 2014 | 3:45 pm
    National Arts Club - 15 Gramercy Park South NYCWednesday, April 30, 8:00 PM a Roundtable / Young Members eventGeorge Grosz, Cultural Enemy Number One of the Nazis: A Legacy in Art and Law George Grosz was tried twice in Germany for his art, once for blasphemy (for his work “Shut Your Mouth and Keep On Serving”) and once for slandering the Prussian military (for his work “Fit for Active Service”). Declared Cultural Enemy Number One by the Nazis, Grosz was physically attacked, and escaped Germany in January 1933, just before Adolf Hitler burned the Reichstag and seized power. Prior to…
  • High Profile Securities Law Decisions - Chief Judge Preska and Free CLE at K&L Gates 4/25

    15 Apr 2014 | 2:10 pm
    The Securities Law and Federal Litigation Sections, along with the Southern District of New York Chapter of the Federal Bar Association presentRecent High Profile Securities Law DecisionsRegisterSpeakers:Hon. Loretta A. PreskaChief Judge, Southern District of New York Mary Jane Lee Director and Associate General Counsel, Citigroup Prof. Paul Radvany Associate Professor of Law, Fordham University Law School Jorge Baez Senior Consultant, NERAStephen J. Crimmins Partner, K&L Gates LLPLiam O’Brien Managing Partner, McCormick & O’Brien, LLPSince the recession of late last decade, there…
 
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    John Palfrey

  • Recent Books: on Adolescence, Technology, Sexuality, and More

    jgpalfrey
    2 Jul 2014 | 2:19 pm
    A few times per year, I have been sharing a “Head of School’s bookshelf” with community members at Phillips Academy.  It comes this time in two parts: 1) six books that are among those I’ve read in the past few months and which I commend as “community reads” because of one or more connections to the work that we have underway at PA; and 2) a special list of readings about sexual education. I express my particular thanks to the members of the PA Sex Ed Working Group, who compiled the Part II listing below at my request.  I hope you might go to your local…
  • The next thing Silicon Valley needs to disrupt big time: its own culture

    jgpalfrey
    26 Jun 2014 | 8:54 am
    jgpalfrey:Fascinating reflection on diversity and Silicon Valley culture. Originally posted on Quartz: There’s a problem with Silicon Valley and the subcultures that imitate it. It’s a design bug woven into people’s identities and sense of self-worth. Influential and otherwise very smart people will deny till their last breath that it even exists. But I believe it does and should be fixed before it gets any worse. Since credentials are so important these days, here are mine. I’m a programmer, and a good one. I’ve worked at several companies that went on to be acquired and one that…
  • We’re now part of the DPLA

    jgpalfrey
    9 May 2014 | 3:04 pm
    jgpalfrey:So excited to welcome the Cambridge Public Library to the Digital Public Library of America! Originally posted on The Cambridge Room: The Cambridge Public Library is now officially part of the Digital Public Library of America or as it is informally called DPLA.  The Cambridge City Directories are now available at the DPLA.  As we digitize more and more historical materials, we’ll add more items to the DPLA. You can search the Cambridge Public Library’s collection here.  The DPLA has a nice timeline feature that you can search here. View original
  • Learning in the World: Global, Community-Based, and Experiential Opportunities

    jgpalfrey
    1 May 2014 | 1:36 pm
    As the Phillips Academy trustees are arriving for a spring weekend, we’ve been talking with a few alums and parents about our plans for the Andover Institute.  One of the three areas of focus involves expanding the global learning opportunities we offer to our students, coming together as ideas here: Learning in the World: Global, Community-Based, and Experiential Opportunities. The overall Institute plan is shaping up here.  We are targeting a launch likely in November, 2014.  Stay tuned!
  • Master Class with Chris Hughes, Phillips Academy ’02 on Hannah Arendt’s “Responsibility and Judgment”

    jgpalfrey
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:24 am
    We have the great privilege today of Chris Hughes‘ visit to Andover.  Chris graduated from Phillips Academy in 2002.  He returns today to teach a master-class with me, to give the All School Meeting address, and to meet with various groups on campus.  The master class takes as its starting point a text: Hannah Arendt’s lecture entitled “Personal Responsibility Under Dictatorship,” published in the book “Responsibility and Judgment.”  In this lecture, delivered in 1964, Arendt responded to criticism of things she previously wrote about the trial of the…
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    Coyle's InFormation

  • Linking, really linking

    28 Jun 2014 | 12:15 pm
    Some time ago I posted a bit of wishful thinking about linking search engine results to library holdings. Now Overdrive has made this a reality, at least in Bing:This appears in the "extended information" area of a Bing search for the Girl with a Dragon Tattoo trilogy. This is based on you having an Overdrive account and I believe you may also have to have given the browser permission to use your location.I don't usually use Bing, and so I was unaware that Bing has made much better use of linked data (in part promoted by the use of schema.org standards) than Google. Here is the Google…
  • Let's link!

    10 May 2014 | 8:51 am
    Tom Johnson responded to a statement of mine in which I said that we need non-programmer tools for linked data work. He asked for case studies, and so I'm going to do some "off the top of my head" riffing here, just to see what might come of it.First, let me say a little something about some analogous technology. Let's take HTML. I'm one of those folks who learned HTML many decades ago when all you needed was <p>, <i>, <b> and maybe <hr>. With these, you could create a web page. Web pages in those days didn't have banners, sidebars, tables ... adding an image was going…
  • Works, Expressions, and the Bibliographic Universe

    25 Apr 2014 | 8:09 am
    In 1545, Conrad Gessner set about to create a bibliography of everything ever published, the Bibliotheca Universalis. He nearly succeeded. In 2004, Google set about to create a digital universal library by digitizing millions of books from library shelves. Shortly thereafter the Internet Archive began a project, the Open Library, to create "One web page for every book ever written." Meanwhile, OCLC's WorldCat has grown to over 300 million records from 72,000 libraries. All of these exemplify the concept of some universal bibliography or database that make up what I am calling, for now, the…
  • FRBR group 1: the gang of four

    1 Apr 2014 | 9:16 pm
    (This is a very delayed follow on to my earlier  post on FRBR groups 2 and 3. It's not that I haven't been thinking about it... and I hope soon to be able to post my talk from FSR2014 on FRBR, as well.) Parts vs. viewsEach of the three FRBR groups is defined briefly in the introduction to section 3 of the FRBR document. The second and third groups have fairly concrete definitions:group 2 "...those responsible for the intellectual or artistic content, the physical production and dissemination, or the custodianship of the entities in the first group"group 3 "...an additional set of…
  • The FRBR Groups

    24 Feb 2014 | 9:11 am
    FRBR has three groups of entities, numbered 1-3. Each group, however, has its own set of characteristics that are very different from each other, so different that they really are different kinds of groups. These differences make it hard to speak of them in one breath. One of the key things to know about the groups is that they aren't classes in the data modeling sense. Why they are therefore grouped at all is not clear, except perhaps it was a convenient way to speak of them. The IFLA FRBR Review Group maintains that the groups do not represent classes and that the ten (or eleven, with…
 
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    Plagiarism Today

  • 3 Count: Expendable Leak

    Jonathan Bailey
    25 Jul 2014 | 10:50 am
    Have any suggestions for the 3 Count? Let me know via Twitter @plagiarismtoday. 1: DOJ to Congress: Make Online Streaming a Felony First off today, Kate Tummarello at The Hill reports that The House Judiciary Committee continued its review of copyright law with a hearing about copyright remedies, which focused on the civil and criminal repercussions for copyright infringement. David Bitkower, the acting deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, testified that there was a need to make infringing streaming a felony, bringing it up to parity with illegal…
  • The Senator John Walsh Plagiarism Scandal

    Jonathan Bailey
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:11 pm
    Senator John Walsh, already behind in his bid for reelection, suffered another setback in his campaign, and possibly his political career, when Jonathan Martin at the New York Times accused Senator Walsh of plagiarizing his master’s thesis. He then backed up his accusations with a marked up version of Senator Walsh’s thesis, with the plagiarized passages highlighted in two different colors. Senator Walsh is not the first politician in recent memory to have been caught plagiarizing. Late last year, Senator Rand Paul was accused of plagiarism in two of his speeches, a book and an…
  • 3 Count: FilmOn Contempt

    Jonathan Bailey
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:39 am
    Have any suggestions for the 3 Count? Let me know via Twitter @plagiarismtoday. 1: FilmOn Faces Contempt Motion First off today, Colin Mann at Advanced Television reports that a Manhattan judge has said that she will likely hold Aereo competitor FilmOn X in contempt of court for continuing to operate after the Supreme Court ruled that Aereo infringed the copyright of broadcasters. FilmOn, like Aereo, is a TV streaming services that uses a series of tiny antennas, one per customer, to capture, record and stream broadcast TV over the Web. The Supreme Court overturned a 2nd Circuit decision…
  • 3 Count: Squeaking By

    Jonathan Bailey
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:15 am
    Have any suggestions for the 3 Count? Let me know via Twitter @plagiarismtoday. 1: Porn Studio Sues Immigrant Who Has “No Idea How BitTorrent Works,” Wins Big First off today, Joe Mullin at Ars Technica reports that Malibu Media, a porn studio that has become notorious for filing lawsuits against suspected file sharers, received a judgment against defendant Don Bui, saying that he was liable for copyright infringement for downloading some 57 films owned by the studio. Bui’s lawyer attempted to portray him as a person who didn’t understand how BitTorrent works, claiming he…
  • The Problem of Attribution Erosion

    Jonathan Bailey
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:12 pm
    Think about your favorite joke. Who told it do you or where did you read it? Who told that person? Who originally came up with it (assuming it was just one person)? Odds are you have no idea who originally thought of your favorite joke or how it was created at all. You have no idea if it evolved from an earlier joke, how any such evolution took place or who added what along the way. That’s because jokes are an excellent example of the idea of attribution erosion. The basic rule of attribution erosion is simple: The More Times a Work Changes Hands, The More Likely Attribution is Going to…
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    Beyond the Book

  • The Wheels of the Amazon Bus Go Round

    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    If the book business were a big yellow school bus, the driver would be a bald fellow wearing a wide grin. More even than before, Jeff Bezos and Amazon have the wheel, while publishers and authors hang on for a rough ride. In particular, speculation about the end game in Amazon’s e-book sales battle with Hachette centers on the impact for authors – a group that Amazon has said the publisher is using as “human shields” in this price war.  Following announcement of its Kindle Unlimited e-book subscription service, in fact, the Amazon-related headaches and car sickness have only…
  • Ending World War Copyright

    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    The creative industries – and the technology companies that carry their content – may share a common customer, but little else. Where it comes to copyright law, their differences have often flared into open war. Technology companies dream of rewriting copyright law to free up content; and content creators search for ways to employ technology in their own favor to prevent piracy. As Non-Executive Chairman of The Copyright Hub Ltd., Richard Hooper is calling for a truce in the copyright wars and has suggestions for forging a lasting peace. At CCC’s US headquarters in Danvers,…
  • Amazon A Busy Negotiator

    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    When Les Moonves, President and CEO of CBS Corporation, the owners of Simon & Schuster, let slip that the Big 5 house was in pricing talks with Amazon, the media world did its best to react with shock. Any expression of surprise, however, could only have been for appearance’s sake. As close observers of the book world already had guessed, the giant e-tailer is likely negotiating quietly with both S&S and HarperCollins, even as its public brawl with Hachette continues. “After all, these are the three publishers that settled with the U.S. Department of Justice right out of the gate…
  • Copyright and the Aereo Decision

    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    13 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    In one corner stood the leading US television broadcast companies together; and in the other opposite corner facing them alone was Aereo, a well-funded startup company that was offering paid subscribers the ability to watch broadcast television in almost-real time over their internet-connected devices. Because Aereo did not get permission from – or pay royalties to – the broadcast networks, the broadcasters sued it for copyright infringement. On appeal from the US Court of Appeals in the Second Circuit, which had held in favor of Aereo and against the broadcast networks, the US Supreme…
  • Amazon To Authors – Take The Whole Enchilada

    rob@burstmarketing.com (BurstMarketing)
    10 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    The offer sounded almost too good to be true, but the reports on Tuesday were from reliable sources. Caught in a publicity fire-fight with Hachette Book Group authors and publishers, Amazon appealed to one of the parties for peace. The online shopping giant had proposed – perhaps more accurately, it had dared –to give Hachette authors 100% of all their e-book revenues for the duration of Amazon’s pricing dispute with the publisher. So what does the bid for authors’ sympathies say about the Amazon perspective on the future of book publishing? “It’s about price control,” Andrew…
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    LibraryLaw Blog

  • What the University of Arkansas controversy can teach us about archival permission practices

    Peter Hirtle
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:23 pm
    (By Peter Hirtle) By now most archivists and many librarians will have heard something about the controversy concerning the use of material found in Special Collections at the University of Arkansas.  Researchers from the Washington Free Beacon (WFB) web site requested and received copies of audio tapes found in a collection.  It published some of those audiotapes online.  It did not, however, first seek permission to publish the items, as library policy requires.  Its reporters' access to special collections was therefore suspended (“banned,” in the words of the site).  You can find…
  • When a library consortium buys an ebook, does the market dry up for that book? : A Super quick interview with Jo Budler, Kansas State Librarian

    Mary
    17 Jul 2014 | 11:32 am
    Minow:  Jo, some publishers tell me that if a library consortium buys an ebook, the publisher makes one sale instead of, say 100. Do you agree?   Budler:  Well, no, that is not how we have seen it work here in Kansas with our statewide consortium.  While we have access to Britannica's E-STAX collection through our membership in the Enki Library, we also purchased this collection with unlimited simultaneous usage to support our Guys Read program.  The goal of this program is to encourage young males to read.  We know that they are more inclined to enjoy non-fiction titles so we began…
  • 15 Jul 2014 | 11:13 am

    Mary
    15 Jul 2014 | 11:13 am
    Zoia Horn made an impact on intellectual freedom When I give intellectual freedom talks to library groups, I often mention a real heroine, Zoia Horn. Zoia is best known for her refusal to testify against members of the Harrisburg Seven during the Viet Nam War. She was warned that she faced jail time if she refused, and the then 53 year old “proper” librarian went to jail for the rest of the trial (almost three weeks). She gave me great encouragement over the years, and inspired legions of librarians who ask themselves, “would I put myself on the line for what I believe in?” Zoia died…
 
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    DigitalKoans

  • DigitalKoans Posts Resume on 8/11/2014

    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    DigitalKoans posts will resume on 8/11/2014. Digital Scholarship | Digital Scholarship Publications Overview | Sitemap
  • Digital Curation News (7/17/2014) #digitalpreservation

    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:52 pm
    "Refresh" For Zombies, Time Jumps Workshop Report: Libraries and Research Data Management The SIMP Tool: Facilitating Digital Library, Metadata, and Preservation Workflow at the University of Utah's J. Willard Marriott Library Scoring, Not Storing: Digital Preservation Assessment Criteria at #digpres14 Weekly Web Archiving Roundup: July 16, 2014 Digital Scholarship | Digital Curation News | Research […]
  • Assistant Systems Librarian at Arkansas State University

    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:33 am
    Arkansas State University is recruiting a Assistant Systems Librarian. Here's an excerpt from the ad: Assistant Systems Librarian will work under the direction and supervision of the Systems Librarian to optimize the library systems, technologies, software, and hardware needed for access to Library resources. Digital Scholarship | Digital Library Jobs | Library IT Jobs | […]
  • Judiciary Committee Hearing on Moral Rights, Termination Rights, Resale Royalty, and Copyright Term

    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:32 am
    The U.S. House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on moral rights, termination rights, resale royalty, and copyright term. Here's an excerpt from "Congress Takes On Copyright Term, Moral Rights, and More": How is this going to work? It's hard to say. Probably not very well. The hearing structure allows a handful of witnesses to […]
  • Associate Director for the Digital Library at NCSU

    Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:31 am
    NCSU is recruiting an Associate Director for the Digital Library. Here's an excerpt from the ad: The Associate Director for the Digital Library provides vision and leadership for information technology; resource management and discovery; and digital projects and associated research and development. The position serves as administrator for three departments: Information Technology (23 FTE), Acquisitions […]
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    Digitization 101

  • Let's emphasize information acquisition across formats and platforms

    18 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    In this more digital world, where people can ingest information through a variety of different media, reading is still emphasized in K-12 schools.  Educators want to create book readers; however, we should be helping students access and learn from information that is provided to them through videos, audio files, etc.  Not everyone will have reading - and by that I mean book reading - as their preferred information acquisition method.School Library SummitAt the 2014 School Library Summit in Albany, NY earlier this month, Dr. Donna DeSiato, superintendent of the East Syracuse…
  • Some people are amateurs & some are pros

    7 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    QuestionWhat is the difference between an amateur and a professional? Hold onto your answer for a few moments, while I tell you a story.In May, I had lunch with Steve Borek, who is a friend and coach, and who works with entrepreneurs.  Steve and I had a lot of catching up to do, including talking about what was fueling our drives to succeed.  It was during this conversation that Steve mentioned the book Turning Pro by Steven Pressfield.  Pressfield has had a career as a successful fiction writer and has added to his success with a couple of non-fiction books.  Turning Pro…
  • LIbrary of Congress Recommended Anolog and Digital Format Specifications

    1 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    As the web site says:Recommended Format Specifications are hierarchies of the physical and technical characteristics of creative formats, both analog and digital, which will best meet the needs of all concerned, maximizing the chances for survival and continued accessibility of creative content well into the future. And:The specifications seek to provide a framework within which creative works should have the flexibility to grow and develop, and also help ensure that these creative works be accessible and authentic into the future.The Library of Congress identified six basic areas of…
  • Sit With Me Advocacy Campaign: Recognizing the value of women's technical contributions

    26 Jun 2014 | 6:00 am
    Earlier this year, the Syracuse University iSchool recorded videos for the Sit With Me Advocacy Campaign and I was one of the women recorded.  The campaign as people to “sit to take a stand” and recognize the value of women’s technical contributions by sharing their own stories and thoughts. The campaign was launched by the National Center for Women in Information Technology (NCWIT).  Below is my video and two others from the iSchool.  You can view all of the videos here.Yes, there is an unfortunate typo in my name within the video itself and it's not easy to fix.
  • #SLA2014 : Closing General Session 

    10 Jun 2014 | 5:43 pm
    Brandy King  - Her topic is "Having It All"Assumptions: Those here have a career and not just a job.To be here we've given up commitments.Our careers are just one part of our busy lives.  50% of our lives are spent a work.  We need work-life balance.  It is fuzzy where work ends and life begins.  You can think of our lives as being divided into three areas: family, career and volunteering.  Some people have clear borders between these areas.  King has blurred the borders of her life. Flexibility has a price and may mean readjusting multiple schedules.
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    Dear Rich: Nolo's Intellectual Property Blog

  • University Won't Patent My Invention

    The Dear Rich Staff
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    It looks like I may have made a scientific breakthrough with definite commercial applications. The thing is the university patent office (who would own the work) is reluctant to start paperwork on it as they say a few patents have already been filed using similar "terms" and applications. The thing is, those ideas have been proven NOT to actually work, whereas I now have good solid data proving my concept (not based on anyone else's work) is the one that will produce results. If someone files a patent for a process, but that process is flawed and does not work, does their patent still hold?
  • Sold Original Painting: Who Gets Copyright?

    The Dear Rich Staff
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dear Rich: Is it possible to sell an original painting and keep ownership at the same time? For example, if I sell the original to someone and later contract for the work to be used in another area of entertainment, could I maintain ownership of work? Unless an artist has signed a written agreement assigning copyright to the buyer  or establishing a work for hire agreeement, the artist retains copyright ownership of the image. That is the "default" arrangement when an artist sells a work. The artist retains exclusive rights to reproduce, license or make derivatives of the work while…
  • Wants to Use 1970s UK Public Service Films

    The Dear Rich Staff
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dear Rich: I was hoping to use sections of the script/narration from a series of UK Public information films from the 1970’s as one visual element in my original artwork. The lines are either a short sentence or part of a sentence (no more than 12 words in one piece or work), and the artwork will be sold in a very limited print run. We think you can use the material without seeking permission. Even if the copyright owner of this 40-year old source material saw your limited edition prints, it's unlikely they would bring an action as the copying is probably too trivial to cause any damage (de…
  • Collage of 1950s Magazines: Fair Use?

    The Dear Rich Staff
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dear Rich: I want to photograph a collage of magazines from the 1950s and reproduce it in a book about the ‘50s. Does this count as fair use – transformative? Putting aside our usual boilerplate response -- fair use can only be determined by a judge or arbitrator -- we think your use is likely to qualify. Our conclusion is based on a few fair use cases: In Warren Publishing Co. v. Spurlock, a Pennsylvania court ruled that it was fair use to reproduce covers of several out-of-print monster magazines from the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s. The covers were used in a biography of the cover…
  • Am I Infringing My Client's Newsletter?

    The Dear Rich Staff
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dear Rich: 1) I am an Independent Contractor and web/graphic designer, and my client thinks that I have appropriately shared proprietary information. Do electronic newsletters constitute proprietary information? 2) I forwarded several emails newsletters at the request of a former employee and friend with whom I had collaborated on the newsletter design. Did I unlawfully share a proprietary work? 3) Does my client own full copyright to the electronic newsletter which I designed? 4) Does usage of the newsletter in a portfolio violate any copyright laws? We think the answers are…
 
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    PrivacyNet

  • Creative Content UK Drops Strikes, Emphasizes Education

    Gordon Platt
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:08 am
    Back in February we posed the question “how many strikes should equal out?“ when it comes to piracy. At the time the UK’s answer was three, but a revision to anti-piracy initiatives this month scraps that in favor of four strikes (and not really out). Following the example of neighbor France, which dropped its controversial five strikes before ISP disconnection last year, the UK’s major creative representatives and Internet Service Providers decided that disconnections, even when temporary, seem to be a step too far. The country’s revised anti-piracy initiative…
  • The Populist Fantasy World of Kim Dotcom

    Gordon Platt
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:27 am
    Kim Dotcom is a name familiar to many. He’s the founder of the now defunct piracy facilitation service Mega and the current service Megaupload. Kim Dotcom, is a German citizen now in residence in New Zealand, awaiting extradition to the United States on charges that include copyright infringement, money laundering and conspiracy to commit racketeering. Kim Dotcom’s exploits have made him a millionaire many times over and he now resides in a fantasyland complex near Auckland. The news from Kim Dotcom-land is that he has summoned the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Glenn…
  • The Aereo Pivot Fail

    Gordon Platt
    18 Jul 2014 | 9:36 am
    Aereo’s latest attempted, semi-pivot to be classed as a cable company has come to an end. After the Supreme Court ruling that the company was in fact rebroadcasting proprietary video content, and was thus open to paying the requisite fees, Aereo then petitioned the U.S. Copyright Office to be classed as a cable system. That would have permitted Aereo to pay a licensing fee to the Copyright Office instead of hefty content fees to copyright owners. The company, which rebroadcasted content via what it argued were actually mini-antennas not subject to rebroadcast fees (the Supreme Court…
  • Google Becomes “The Man” in DC

    Gordon Platt
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:40 am
    Google’s brand has long claimed to rep technology’s rebellious spirit – a small band of underdogs against “the man.” And maybe that was once they case, like when they still worked out of a garage in Silicon Valley. Those days are long gone. What happens when the rebel becomes “the man” was on display earlier this week at the sumptuous opening of Google’s D.C. office. Google and its chief lobbyist, former Republican Congresswoman Susan Molinari feted Capitol Hill stalwarts on a spread that included “molecular” gin and tonics and…
  • 23andMe Shot Itself in the Foot

    Gordon Platt
    16 Jul 2014 | 9:04 am
    23andMe, the once hot medical diagnostics company that stopped offering its consumer friendly, at home genetic diagnostic tests in December has become a poster child for many in the tech community who rally against government interference in entrepreneurship and innovation. But there’s no debate to be had. 23andMe brought about its own demise. I believe that the 23andMe case exemplifies what has become the nature of the response to setbacks from some in the tech community. The response has been similar from some developers of media sharing technologies who blame media companies for…
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